Shifting sands

It has been a complex business. I had thought that coming home would have some kind of natural simplicity implicit in its processes. After all we weren’t trying to migrate to new pastures we were simply returning home after an extended spell overseas…11 years in NZ. I hadn’t expected it to be smooth, there were going to be hurdles and obstacles but I had expected it to have some kind of “this is your home” ring to it. I think the shifting sands of Morecambe best sums it up. Things were the same but somehow different. Faces were familiar but somehow not recognisable. In our absence, the shifting sands had changed the landscape.

In spite of this there was an absolute joy in recognising and reconnecting with familiar buildings and walking in the ghostly footsteps left from our previous wanderings and the feeling of warmth and belonging were rekindled by the crisp winter evening air, the ghostly morning mists and the memory of plants and flowers long forgotten in childhood.

Pussy willow tree
In February drizzle
Catkins caress spring

 

Today for Haibun Monday we were asked to reflect on the best things of life being for free and the catkins this Sunday did it for me. Long forgotten childhood treasure.

#d’Verse

 

Francie

Haibun/Haiku on Nature

Write a haibun at dVerse on any subject- I wanted to capture the power of nature. This weekend there was a terrible tragedy at sea over on the other side of the coast where the seas were very high and powerful. A fishing charter boat- The Francie capsized or similar crossing the bar, there were 11 aboard, three survived and the bodies of 7 recovered,one is still missing. The power of nature is not to be scoffed at. I hope I did them justice in my short Haiku. God rest their souls. XXXX

In terms of rough seas in summertime I have experienced the terrifying forces of nature, a long time ago 1985 I was crossing the English Channel from Deauville to Poole with my parents in a 26ft yacht, a Dufour, very skittish even with extra ballast. There was a ferocious storm and the waves were very powerful and we were knocked off course and struggled for more than 12 hours to stay upright, we finally made safe harbour near Brighton after 36 hours at sea, the last 12sailing up and down a 5 mile stretch trying to locate where we were, there was a dangerous sandspit called Selsey Bill that we didn’t want to run aground on. We survived though, harnessed to the boat. We were fortunate.800px-SelseyHaylingPortsea.JPG

Francie

Darkened seascape

Heaving, the Boat braves the Bar

Spills her load to death