I thought I had it sussed but you don’t know what you don’t know.

Sometimes your life can change in a second. A split second.

FAITH that which anchors us.

There you are swimming along, taking in the scenery, drinking in the wonderful aroma of a rich fulfilling life, clear in the knowledge of who you are, where you are at and where you are heading for and then BOOM.

A split second, no time to weigh things up, stack odds against likelihoods decide on the most suitable path forward and … Just BOOM.

FAITH that which anchors us.

In computer games, it is the moment when the screen says Game Over. You lost your final life, it wasn’t planned, it was some sneaky attack from nowhere, a slight slip of the thumb and the computer registered an 8 instead of a 7 and BOOM- game over. It wasn’t even intentional.

It is likely to be your own fault, a lapse in concentration, a misguided loyalty, a misunderstanding, too much haste in a too pressured job and that is it. Wiped out in a nanosecond. No insanity plea, no curtain call, just fingers gripping the edge hoping that you won’t fall, just silent prayers to an overworked God asking for forgiveness.

If you are lucky and your prayers are answered you will live to fight another day. You will be thankful, and kinder and maybe wiser and certainly more careful. You will always know and understand that everything can and does change in a split second for good or bad, better or worse and you will always know that the split-second can be at any moment in your life-that it is unlikely to have been planned, or heralded by omens and signs. Just BOOM.

FAITH that which anchors us.

© Alison Jean Hankinson

Atonement

The rain washes away the sorrow

It cleanses the impurity of the years before

and soothes the shallow breathing of the old man.

 

Pitter, patter, pitter, patter on the old tin roof

Melodies of days long gone when forsooth

I was a younger man, of stronger mettle.

 

The rain washes away the sin and surrender

Purifies the pungent putrid memories of this life before

Soothes the sallow sagging skeleton that sits beside the bed.

 

Drip, drop, drip, drop, drip, drop on the old tin shed

Reminds me of all the things I still have left unsaid

To those who loved me beyond the bounds of duty and sanity.

 

The rain washes away the pain and the punishment

Washes away the abusive torture and the brutal beatings.

Rain brings reparation for a wretched soul in search of absolution.

 

Pitter, patter, drip, drop, pitter, patter, payday

As my sins have been forgiven I forgive them their sinful way

Forgive my wartime crimes Lord. Take my soul today.

 

© Alison Jean Hankinson

 

raindrops-1404209_1920

 

The theme tonight at d’Verse was rain, and it was supposed to be a positive contribution. I spent many years in NZ and rain is often seen as symbolic, it is cleansing or purifying, so in the image (from pixabay) the rain and rainbow would be seen as celebratory. I think atonement is positive but perhaps not quite what would have been expected.