At the final sunset

In the end

It doesn’t matter what you had

It matters what you gave.

 

In the end

It doesn’t matter what you avoided

It matters what you did.

 

In the end

It doesn’t matter what they thought of you

It matters how you perceived yourself.

 

What joy gave your own life meaning

What peace you found in your own heart.

What indelible moments you left in the hearts and minds

Of the people you loved and who loved you.

 

©Alison Jean Hankinson

Paul Scribbles asked us to write about “the end” for d’verse.

 

 

 

 

Without Fear.

Sunshine breaks through the clouds

after the rain had refreshed and restored

with its patient pitter patter on the window pane.

 

Fear was vanquished

in just one moment of stillness and calm and quiet contemplation.

We are so small and insignificant compared to nature.

 

©Alison Jean Hankinson.

 

This was written for d”Verse quadrille prompt which this week was the word fear. The photo is my own and it was taken this evening as I made the most of a dry spell. I took it for Ellen and was messaging her in NZ throughout my walk. We have all faced fears and uncertainties this year and the only thing I know is that tomorrow will bring new fears and realities and that we must take solace from the moments that are bigger than our fears.

Smile

The power of a smile is totally underestimated by most people. It is a simple gesture that means so much and it is used both consciously and subconsciously on a daily basis by most of us. There have been times in my life where it was a smile that made the difference.

A smile says “I accept you.”

A smile says “I get it, I understand”

A smile says “I love you.”

A smile says “It’s okay.”

A smile says “Hallo- I missed you.”

A smile says “Thanks for your support.”

A smile says “I will walk alongside you through your pain.”

A smile says “I am proud of you.”

A smile says “I value you.”

 

When you light up my life with a smile,

you make the moment and my existence more worthwhile.

©Alison Jean Hankinson.

 

 

Give Thanks

We are often blinded to what is of real value in our lives. We are often blind-sided by material wealth and economic worth and seek to measure our worth according to our apparent successes and failures at acquiring wealth and establishing some form of economic status based on it. These high expectations can indeed plummet us into great chasms of despair when our net worth based on these rigid criteria is seemingly low or even non-existent.

At 50 I find that I appear to be worth less in wages and respect than I was when I was 25. This has been a hard lesson to learn. However I can live off less, and I realise that so much of how I have measured myself is based on unrealistic monetised criteria.

I hope we somehow teach our children to recognise and measure their value and worth in other ways.

I hope they learn to measure their wealth in the size of their hearts and the depth of their compassion.

I hope they learn to measure their worth in their ability to give thanks, in their tolerance and their preparedness to give support and guidance to others in need.

I hope that they learn that time is of value and is often underestimated.

When you put aside the desire to be the most successful, or to have the most money it gives you the opportunity to look more closely at what you achieved in life and what is of value in and around you.

I am thankful to have had the opportunity to be a mum, and for me this was not a done deal.

I am thankful that I have been able to work most of my life in a job that has been profoundly interesting, engaging and in a field that I have been extremely passionate about.

I have been fortunate and am thankful that my work has been fulfilling and challenging and that I have often felt that I am making a worthwhile and valid contribution to society.

I am thankful for my family, all of them, warts and all, a husband who has at times driven me to distraction but always been there to hold my hand and walk beside me when the road has been tough. I am thankful for my children who have made me what I am, everything I have done has been to be able to give them something of value and worth. I am thankful for my sister and my parents for all that they gave to me and all that I learned from them.

I am thankful that when I have made mistakes I have had opportunities to recover and learn and try again.

I am thankful for the friendship and love I have received over the years from people whom I have loved and cherished and also sometimes from complete strangers.

I am thankful for the world around me, the beautiful buildings with their amazing stories, the sea and the landscape, the weather and all that is nature, from the humble daisy to a seascape at sunset.

When we take time to think about what makes us glad, we are able to remember that value and worth are not necessarily linked to money.

Namaste.

©Alison Jean Hankinson

Witches brew, Lancaster Castle

 

Castle cauldron boiling

Old Chattox caterwauling

Deep in dungeon desperate days

Witches wasting away.

 

John Law was cursed and died

Whilst on the open road

His crime to scorn Alison Device

And her familiar spirit dog.

 

Chattox turned the milk sour

Confessed to killing Robert Nutter

All ten witches tried at the assize

In the court at the castle of Lancaster

 

Witches sabbat

Malkin tower

Death by hanging

We remember forever.

 

©Alison Jean Hankinson

This was for d’Verse we were asked to use verbs and a landscape that spoke to us. Today I was at Lancaster castle meeting up with a friend who is visiting from NZ. This castle is an important part of Lancaster’s landscape and has existed in some shape and form for more than 1000 years. It is the home of the assizes and courts and is part of the Royal Duchy of Lancaster. One of the most famous trials was that of the Pendle witches in 1612, where 10 were found guilty and hanged. The stone was part of a series commissioned on the 400th anniversary to commemorate the witches story. There is a tercet on each stone and they are located around the city.

At the trial the evidence of Jennet Device who was only 9 years old, is believed to have set the precedent for using children as witnesses in witch trials and this was to have an impact as far afield as Salem.