Depression-never give up hope.

Destructive tendencies overshadow joy

Empty heart and emotionless void

Piercing silence and perpetual loneliness

Replaces peace and solitude.

Even in our darkest hours we seek the light.

 

Sustain our strength with firm resolve

Support each other with promises new

In higher spirits soar above the stigma and the shame

Overcome the numbness.

Never give up on tomorrow

©Alison Jean Hankinson

At d’Verse Frank challenged us to create an acrostic, and this is tonight’s offering, I might have another later, because he introduced me to some other styles and I might have a go at one of them.

I took the photos tonight down on the beach, it was a beautiful late summer dusk, I wanted to catch the seagull soaring to represent the spirit and hope at the end of the acrostic, they soar too fast and my hands are not steady enough…but I was happy with the two I managed to capture for here. This is what I do to uplift my spirit.

Autumn’s playground.

Bright blue wellington boots

Splashing through the stream

Autumn leaves surrender

Children’s faces gleam.

 

Splishing through the water

Matching coats and hats

Sunday forest fun-day,

Walking wet and muddy tracks.

 

Collecting up prickly conkers

Sycamore whizzers and pine cones

Autumn’s children’s playground

Before winter chills their bones.

 

© Alison Jean Hankinson

This is for d’Verse where we were asked to think about shoes. Mine became wellington boots.

Image labelled for reuse-

Every autumn in the UK the fruit of the horse chestnut is gathered by children in order to play the age old game of “conkers”. (U.S. Air Force photo/Judith Wakelam)

 

Road Trip to Brighouse Bay.

 

As a young boy in Kirkcudbright,

Dad sat on the harbour wall eating fish n chips.

Summer bliss.

 

Wet and windy August Bank holiday

Returning to old haunts with Dad,

Trip down memory lane,

Eating haddock and chips

In the bandstand in the rain.

© Alison Jean Hankinson

My offering for d’Verse after a blissful weekend away in the caravan taking a trip down memory lane with Dad.

 

 

Shadows of yesterday, promises of tomorrow.

Today we took my Dad’s caravan to Kirkudbright for him. As this year has progressed I have learned to accept that it isn’t about the wealth we have or the belongings that we possess but about the moments we share with the people that we love.

Mum passed away in August 2008, she is probably still giving someone grief up there for how untimely that was at 64, as she had worked all her life and never got to draw her pension. I had emigrated to New Zealand in 2006 with my husband and the girls, and got stuck with our property falling into negative equity following the global recession and no hope of returning to the UK, and I didn’t even make it home for the funeral.

My sister held everything together. She helped Dad and sorted affairs and then continued to shoulder the weight of Dad’s illness. He was diagnosed with cancer less than six months after mum’s passing and the weight loss that we had put down to grief was actually the cancer eating away at him. He had some major surgery to remove a lung and was given fairly low odds of survival, but survive he did, and whilst he was unable to receive any chemotherapy, he was too ill and frail, he slowly healed and recovered. He was never really able to return to being an active solo captain on his boat without his beloved bosun and the years rolled by until in 2011 he got his beloved Emma dog. He then grew from strength to strength and got his first camper van in 2013, followed by an upgrade in 2015. In 2016 finally after seven years, we managed to sell our house in NZ and we returned home at the beginning of 2017.

Fast forward to today and the latest roadtrip as we were able to drive Dad’s newly acquired caravan north to Kirkudbright for him. It is these moments that make all the complexities and turmoil of the last decade somewhat worthwhile.

Driving to Kirkudbright itself was a trip down memory lane, we often went there camping as a family when we were younger, as Dad had lived there as a child. Ironically Galloway had also been a favourite haunt of my husband’s family. My husband and I honeymooned for 2 nights along the same Galloway route at the Isle of Whithorn in 1994, the car breaking down in Dumfries on the way, robbing us of a night’s money. We then camped and visited Dumfries and Galloway fairly regularly in our early marriage even partying on down for Hogmany in Portpatrick with friends on numerous occasions. Emily learned a lot on the journey northward. Every name on every road sign brought back some distant memory and now there was a new excitement as what we were embarking on was a new adventure, and a new opportunity to create new memories both for and with Dad.

Our lives can and do change so rapidly. It is important to treasure and cherish each moment that is of meaning and see it for its true value and worth especially when we live in troubling times where values seem to be challenged and dropped so readily and with such ease.

I was glad to be able to have today. I hope there will be many more days like today.

It was a day full of promise. It took a long time to get here but we got here in the end.

©Alison Jean Hankinson

Hospital Birth

Darkest hours

Patiently pacing

Dim-lit dawn

Life-embracing.

 

Bald cry echoes

Through the walls

First born child’s

Entrance call.

Birth Newborn Sleeping Baby Girl Infant Hospital

 

This is for Jillys challenge

Where we complete the beginning of a poem and see if someone else can complete it. So this is my beginning bit.

The image was for reuse in the public domain from max pixel.

Alison Jean Hankinson

Without Fear.

Sunshine breaks through the clouds

after the rain had refreshed and restored

with its patient pitter patter on the window pane.

 

Fear was vanquished

in just one moment of stillness and calm and quiet contemplation.

We are so small and insignificant compared to nature.

 

©Alison Jean Hankinson.

 

This was written for d”Verse quadrille prompt which this week was the word fear. The photo is my own and it was taken this evening as I made the most of a dry spell. I took it for Ellen and was messaging her in NZ throughout my walk. We have all faced fears and uncertainties this year and the only thing I know is that tomorrow will bring new fears and realities and that we must take solace from the moments that are bigger than our fears.

Smile

The power of a smile is totally underestimated by most people. It is a simple gesture that means so much and it is used both consciously and subconsciously on a daily basis by most of us. There have been times in my life where it was a smile that made the difference.

A smile says “I accept you.”

A smile says “I get it, I understand”

A smile says “I love you.”

A smile says “It’s okay.”

A smile says “Hallo- I missed you.”

A smile says “Thanks for your support.”

A smile says “I will walk alongside you through your pain.”

A smile says “I am proud of you.”

A smile says “I value you.”

 

When you light up my life with a smile,

you make the moment and my existence more worthwhile.

©Alison Jean Hankinson.