Love beyond the grave.

She gave away her heart

Beneath the beating sun

He held her hand so close

She was his only one.

 

In time, they knew, love grew

More each day and more

The years went by, youth flew

Old age caught up for sure.

 

In death she held his heart

And wept for days of old

Her tears ran down his face

Against her skin his hand felt cold.

 

Love lingers on beyond

Though tears she sheds no more

She takes his love to Heaven

His soul to meet once more.

 

©Alison Jean Hankinson

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A second attempt for d’Verse…at trimeter…wonder if I got it this time?

The image is my Great Grandfather John Henry Mcclanaghan and his wife Frances with their eldest daughter Frances. Taken about 1904. theirs was an unusual love story. Some of it is in the link below.

Salford Pals

 

 

 

 

Any Old Iron

Roaring “Rag and Bone”

Bellowing  “Rag and Bone”

Poorhouse strays, poverty weighs

Pawnshop dray, debtors pay

Loanshark says,

change your ways

Or else….we’ll end your days.

 

©Alison Jean Hankinson

 

The challenge that Frank set at d’Verse was to create a poem in trimeter. I had to think and try really hard and I am not sure if it is or isn’t so hopefully it is. Frank said “For this challenge, write a poem that uses trimeter lines. All of the lines in the poem do not have to be in trimeter, but enough should be so that one can tell this meter was used on purpose. The poems do not have to rhyme nor must they have any other sound qualities about them.

The rag and bone man used to come along our road in the 1970’s shouting “Any old iron” in fact we used them a bit like a swap shop, we put things on the cart and sometimes we took something in return. I was a child.

The image was labelled for reuse from Flickr and was actually from Newcastle libraries. this went with the photo:

Tor623, Rag and Bone Man, Newcastle upon Tyne
Description: Laszlo Torday arrived in Tynemouth in January 1940 from Hungary and took most of his photographs of Tyneside during the 1960’s and 1970’s. They reflect his interest in the streets and people of Newcastle especially of central Newcastle and the suburbs of Heaton and Jesmond. : The physical collection held by Newcastle Libraries comprises 100 photograph albums of black and white prints plus 16 boxes of colour transparencies. We are keen to find out more about them.

Witches brew, Lancaster Castle

 

Castle cauldron boiling

Old Chattox caterwauling

Deep in dungeon desperate days

Witches wasting away.

 

John Law was cursed and died

Whilst on the open road

His crime to scorn Alison Device

And her familiar spirit dog.

 

Chattox turned the milk sour

Confessed to killing Robert Nutter

All ten witches tried at the assize

In the court at the castle of Lancaster

 

Witches sabbat

Malkin tower

Death by hanging

We remember forever.

 

©Alison Jean Hankinson

This was for d’Verse we were asked to use verbs and a landscape that spoke to us. Today I was at Lancaster castle meeting up with a friend who is visiting from NZ. This castle is an important part of Lancaster’s landscape and has existed in some shape and form for more than 1000 years. It is the home of the assizes and courts and is part of the Royal Duchy of Lancaster. One of the most famous trials was that of the Pendle witches in 1612, where 10 were found guilty and hanged. The stone was part of a series commissioned on the 400th anniversary to commemorate the witches story. There is a tercet on each stone and they are located around the city.

At the trial the evidence of Jennet Device who was only 9 years old, is believed to have set the precedent for using children as witnesses in witch trials and this was to have an impact as far afield as Salem.

 

Jack “Legs” Diamond

“Are you serious? ” Alice said

“Stone cold He’s dead”

Shot in the head

Whilst sat in bed.

 

He was a malevolent man

From evil clan

Drug run thriller

Gangland killer

 

Prohibition mafia man

Irish dance-man

Legs Diamond

The Clay pigeon.

 

©Alison Jean Hankinson

Playing with a new form- the minute for d’Verse. This is about Jack the legs Diamond, who was perhaps related to Lily and Fairground Fay.

He was a real gangster and his wife was Alice Kenny Diamond. The image is a prohibition image and is creative commons.

Familial traits, the signs we try to hide.

IMG_2047

God rest your soul

The sins of the father shall be forever imprinted on your weary brow

He filchered and fettled and frolicked in the sun

Leaving behind a string of homeless wives and penniless sons

These faults are incumbent on you and you will falter and fail

Unless you take heed of the signs and learn the lessons.

Give constancy care and compassion

Avoid adultery and count your blessings.

 

Alison Jean Hankinson

For d’verse poetics, the challenge was sign.

 

 

Bring out yer dead….

Black death blood and guts

Fleas on rats as big as cats

Summer death follows.

 

Alison Jean Hankinson

V0010682 A rat stowing away on a ship, carrying the plague further af

This is for d’Verse poetics we were asked to write a poem that was related to a sign or symbol and this came from my Year 7 teaching today, where the red cross on the door of a house meant the occupants had the plague and the cries on the street were “Bring out yer dead”.

The image is from Wikimedia.

The file from Wellcome images-

A rat stowing away on a ship, carrying the plague further afield. Drawing by A.L. Tarter, 194-.

Iconographic Collections
Keywords: Albert Lloyd Tarter